Palmse manor

Palmse mõis

Estonia Lääne-Viru County

4.7 (3 Reviews)

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    • Architectural style

      Gothic, Baroque
    • Construction

      1550
    • Architect

      J.C.Mohr
    4
    View gallery

    Wine Tasting

    The manor’s wine cellar contains more than 130 varieties of wine, including Palmse Manor’s house wines, which have been chosen with great care. This year’s house wines are Zimmermann Riesling Classic and Michel Schneider Dornfelder. We also have local sweet berry wines. For groups of ten or more, we conduct a fun and sociable game of recognising wines. Everyone gets to taste five wines. The person with the highest score receives a diploma and a prize.

    Potatoe peels

    2.00€

    Guesthouse

    2 suits 2 junior suits, 4 double rooms, 4 three-person rooms, 4 four-person rooms.

    The Path of the Lord of the Manor

    The Path of the Lord of the Manor meanders from between the ponds to Kivitamme bridge and from there along the steep bank of the river Võsu to Inglisild bridge and then continues to Brest pavilion.

    Vodka Tasting

    At the exhibition ‘Estonian Spirits’, it is possible to taste beverages made of various ingredients.

    Horse and pony riding

    During its heyday, the manor housed, in addition to all the workhorses, nearly 30 noble roadsters.  To be chosen as a roadster, the horse had to be slim, small-headed, and light-footed . Today, the visitors can ride an Estonian bred horse Ringi, and two Shetland ponies called Carlos and Jaagu.

    Forging Happiness

    Coining a lucky piece is something everyone is able to do and is also somewhat mysterious and exiting. When possible, everyone may get a blank and coin, using the old anvil and a hammer under the smith’s supervision, their own lucky piece with a picture of Palmse manor on it. Under the smith’s guidance, groups have an opportunity to forge a lucky nail. As a proof of completing the task, the senior smith also issues a corresponding certificate.

    Boat Ride on the Manor’s Pond

    Romantic boat rides between the rotunda, coffee shop, and bathhouse. The boats are named after three maidens of the manor – Betsy, Isabella, and Olga.

    Watching a Slideshow

    In the Lahemaa Information Centre, it is possible to watch the slide programme ‘Nature and Humans’ in Estonian, Russian, German, and English.

    Walking in the French Formal Garden

    Walking in the French formal garden gives delight to the eyes and replenishes the soul.

    The Path of the Maiden of the Manor

    The Path of the Maiden of the Manor winds between the ponds, and turns right behind the root cellar, goes to the nunnery rocks, and ends by the farm labourers’ house. Food and drink can be had in the farm labourers’ house tavern. To get back to the manor’s courtyard from the farm labourers’ house, one has to cross the field. The trail is about 1 km long. The trail is marked with yellow markings.

    Manor House

    The manor house gives an excellent idea of how the lords of the manor used to live. There are small and large informative exhibitions.

    Estonian Spirits

    The exhibition gives an historic overview of spirits and vodka production in Estonia from the 15th century until the end of the 19th century.

    Exotic Plants

    The manor’s orangery was built in the 19th century and it houses over 130 species of exotic plants (e.g. camellias, grapevines, peach trees, and common figs). The lovely and intoxicatingly fragrant flowers of the Queen of the Night, or Nightblooming Cereus, can be enjoyed every year around St. John’s Day. The Queen of the Night opens its vanilla-scented flowers for only one night and just once a year. There are also budgerigars among the palm trees and koi swimming in a small pond .

    19th Century Hammered Works

    The smithy was built in the beginning of the 19th century, but even today one can observe how iron is worked and, if possible, even try it themselves. Various hammered works and blacksmith’s tools are exhibited as well.

    Park-Hotel Palmse

    Park Hotel Palmse, the converted manor distillery, is set amongst unspoilt nature. Enjoy a relaxing holiday, and stay at our country hotel with 27 rooms.

    Did you know that ...

    The manor house has become what it is today through several stages. The construction started in 1697. It burned down and was built up again in the end of the 1720s, and then architect J.C.Mohr was commissioned to redesign it in between 1782 and 1785.

    A unique manor complex boasting 36 buildings with both English and French parks on 52 hectares in the possession of Foundation Museums of Virumaa...

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      History

      Under the Convent’s Tutelage (1287 – 1510)

      The 1287 written confirmation on the convent’s premises by Erik VI Menved also mentions Palmse. By about 1300, Palmse had become the convent’s sustenance manor. In 1510, Abbess Elisabet Brincke exchanged Palmse manor for Bertram Junge’s Nabala manor. During this period, the manor mainly grew grain –rye and barley. Two watermills – Oruveski and Joaveski – have also been mentioned.

      The Family Metztacken (1522 – 1677)

      Starting from 1522, Palmse manor belonged to the family Metztacken. During the Livonian War, a major part of the manor’s buildings were destroyed, but their renovation started after the Treaty of Altmark in 1629. According to the greta ownership revision conducted by the Swedish authorities in 1586, the manor covered 21 ploughlands. Fishing sites on the sea and internal bodies of water both were relevant. In 1648, Arend Metztacken, Lord of the Manor of Palmse, went to court with the lessee of the Sagadi manor over the lake Võsu Üllikjärv, for the latter wished to gain sole control over the lake. The marine fishing site of Palmse manor was on Võsu beach.
      The Family von der Pahlen (1677 – 1923)

      Gustav Christian von der Pahlen started building the manor ensemble; however, the construction was halted by the Great Famine of Estonia (1695 – 1697) and by the Great Northern War. In 1710, Palmse was struck by a plague epidemic, which killed 229 people, and the manor was left in a rather wretched state.

      Not long after the Great Northern War, however, construction was continued, and by mid-18th century, Palmse had become a true baroque ensemble of nearly twenty buildings. In the end of the century, when distilling vodka became one of the major sources of income for the lords of the manor, a new distillery as well as a bullock stable (for the distilling residue was valuable fodder) were built. As the distilling industry grew, so did the fields and the labour impost. The vodka was sold to Tallinn and marketed in local taverns – Viitna, Rahkama and Kõrve, and Võsu. In the end of the 19th century, raw spirits were sold to PLC Rosen&Co.
      Palmse manor’s brick kiln in Võsu was built at least by 1789, but the bricks were mostly to satisfy the manor’s own needs. Starting from 1868, a modern brick kiln with Hoffmann ovens and horse-driven brick press was used. In addition to bricks, roof tiles were made as well.

      By the end of the 19th century, Palmse was one of the largest manors in terms of area. The land amassed to over 10,000 ha – most of it forests and bogs. The manor had 384 ha of arable land and 549 ha of hayfields, and there were about 900 peasants. The majority of income came from renting out cattle manors and farms, selling firewood and planks, the brick industry, and selling raw spirits. In addition to large concerns, the manor also had for its own use a dairy, weavers’ workshop, a limestone quarry, and lime and tar kilns.

       

      The Manor from Its Nationalization Until Today

      In 1923, the manor’s land was divided into small holdings and the manor’s heart was given to the Defence League’s use. During this period the wing built in the 1830s was destroyed. After the land reform, the brick kiln in Võsu and Oruveski Sawmill remained with the Phalens, who, in turn, rented them out. The brick kiln was in use until 1933. After World War II, the manor was used as a summer camp location for pioneers. Lahemaa National Park was founded in 1971, and soon after manor renovations started as well. Palmse was the first manor in Estonia that was restored along with all the buildings in the heart of the manor, which in turn, gave a good overview of a characteristic Estonian manor through centuries. The restoration, carried out in 1975 – 1985, revealed murals, which were restored as well. The refurbished was opened to the public in 1986.

      Architecture

      1

      Current situation

      Since 2002, Palmse manor ensembly belongs to the Foundation Museums of Virumaa

       

      Connected buildings

      • Bathhouse

      • STOREHOUSE

        Built in 1820, the renovated storehouse is an ideal place for putting up various exhibitions.

      • ORANGERY

        One of the most beautiful buildings in the manor ensemble is the orangery – conservatory was built in 1870.

      • 4.7
      • nice place

        4

        nice service and good food

        Ave Saksen

      • Fantastic

        5

        We had a fantastic stay there with our whole family. Very friendly staff and cosy rooms.

        Johannes

      • Beautiful and elegant

        5

        Beautiful manor, magic nature, a lot of interesting concerts and other cultural events <3

        Nida Ellen

    • Guesthouse

      The guesthouse can accommodate forty-four persons. The rooms do not have showers and toilets; these are situated in the hall and a for shared in between two rooms.

      • Guesthouse

        2 suits 2 junior suits, 4 double rooms, 4 three-person rooms, 4 four-person rooms.

      • Park-Hotel Palmse

        Park Hotel Palmse, the converted manor distillery, is set amongst unspoilt nature. Enjoy a relaxing holiday, and stay at our country hotel with 27 rooms.

    • Palmse Tavern

      This is a tavern that always offers particularly delicious ancestral dishes – real farm labourer’s gruel, homemade bread, and butter are always on the table.

      Apetizers

      • 1.60€

        Pickles with honey

      • 2.00€

        Potatoe peels

      • 2.60€

        Garlic bread

      • 2.60€

        Salted Beans

      • 9.60€

        Snacks choice for 4 beer lovers

      Soups

      • 4,40

        Lentils soup

      • 4,40

        Fermented cabage soup

      • 4,40

        Pumpkin soup

      Meals for children

      • 4.50

        Meatballs with mashed potatoes

      • 4.90

        Mini blood sausages with oven baked potatoes and lingonberry salad

      • 4.40

        Dumplings

      Smaller Meals

      • Cod liver salad with toast

      Bigger meals

    • Hiking Trails

      The Palmse park covers over 210 ha of land and consists of several different parts – regular park, landscape park, and forest park. In the mid-19th century, a large park was created in the natural forest growing behind the ponds. The park was designed in such a way that the landscape’s varied profile with rivers, streams, and Oruveski reservoir with its small islets were incorporated beautifully . The park was criss-crossed with many roads and paths, which had the total length of 36 versts (38.4 km).

      • The Path of the Lord of the Manor

        The Path of the Lord of the Manor meanders from between the ponds to Kivitamme bridge and from there along the steep bank of the river Võsu to Inglisild bridge and then continues to Brest pavilion.

      • The Path of the Maiden of the Manor

        The Path of the Maiden of the Manor winds between the ponds, and turns right behind the root cellar, goes to the nunnery rocks, and ends by the farm labourers’ house. Food and drink can be had in the farm labourers’ house tavern. To get back to the manor’s courtyard from the farm labourers’ house, one has to cross the field. The trail is about 1 km long. The trail is marked with yellow markings.

      Activities

      • Wine Tasting

        The manor’s wine cellar contains more than 130 varieties of wine, including Palmse Manor’s house wines, which have been chosen with great care. This year’s house wines are Zimmermann Riesling Classic and Michel Schneider Dornfelder. We also have local sweet berry wines. For groups of ten or more, we conduct a fun and sociable game of recognising wines. Everyone gets to taste five wines. The person with the highest score receives a diploma and a prize.

      • Vodka Tasting

        At the exhibition ‘Estonian Spirits’, it is possible to taste beverages made of various ingredients.

      • Horse and pony riding

        During its heyday, the manor housed, in addition to all the workhorses, nearly 30 noble roadsters.  To be chosen as a roadster, the horse had to be slim, small-headed, and light-footed . Today, the visitors can ride an Estonian bred horse Ringi, and two Shetland ponies called Carlos and Jaagu.

      • Forging Happiness

        Coining a lucky piece is something everyone is able to do and is also somewhat mysterious and exiting. When possible, everyone may get a blank and coin, using the old anvil and a hammer under the smith’s supervision, their own lucky piece with a picture of Palmse manor on it. Under the smith’s guidance, groups have an opportunity to forge a lucky nail. As a proof of completing the task, the senior smith also issues a corresponding certificate.

      • Boat Ride on the Manor’s Pond

        Romantic boat rides between the rotunda, coffee shop, and bathhouse. The boats are named after three maidens of the manor – Betsy, Isabella, and Olga.

      • Watching a Slideshow

        In the Lahemaa Information Centre, it is possible to watch the slide programme ‘Nature and Humans’ in Estonian, Russian, German, and English.

      • Walking in the French Formal Garden

        Walking in the French formal garden gives delight to the eyes and replenishes the soul.

      Exhibitions

      • Manor House

        The manor house gives an excellent idea of how the lords of the manor used to live. There are small and large informative exhibitions.

      • Estonian Spirits

        The exhibition gives an historic overview of spirits and vodka production in Estonia from the 15th century until the end of the 19th century.

      • Exotic Plants

        The manor’s orangery was built in the 19th century and it houses over 130 species of exotic plants (e.g. camellias, grapevines, peach trees, and common figs). The lovely and intoxicatingly fragrant flowers of the Queen of the Night, or Nightblooming Cereus, can be enjoyed every year around St. John’s Day. The Queen of the Night opens its vanilla-scented flowers for only one night and just once a year. There are also budgerigars among the palm trees and koi swimming in a small pond .

      • 19th Century Hammered Works

        The smithy was built in the beginning of the 19th century, but even today one can observe how iron is worked and, if possible, even try it themselves. Various hammered works and blacksmith’s tools are exhibited as well.